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Important to have new rescues vetted!


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Hi everyone, last Friday I got my new CAG Andy that was a rescue, I posted some pics of him in a few of the other threads. One thing everyone needs to be aware of is how important it is to have their parrots, rescue's or not checked out at least yearly by an avian vet and a rescue within a week or two of getting them. If I didn't take Andy to the vet I wouldn't of known he had a crop infection that needed antibiotics as he was eating and acting fine and also blood work showed his calcium level was a little low, not at a dangerous level but something that needed to be addressed. His vet was very thorough in his check-up and overall educated me more on the care of a CAG. The fun part for me is going to get him to take his medicine and to get him to eat some of the supplements the vet gave me until he decides to eat some of his new food...good thing is he seems to like everything that is given to him to eat.

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Hi everyone, last Friday I got my new CAG Andy that was a rescue, I posted some pics of him in a few of the other threads. One thing everyone needs to be aware of is how important it is to have their parrots, rescue's or not checked out at least yearly by an avian vet and a rescue within a week or two of getting them. If I didn't take Andy to the vet I wouldn't of known he had a crop infection that needed antibiotics as he was eating and acting fine and also blood work showed his calcium level was a little low, not at a dangerous level but something that needed to be addressed. His vet was very thorough in his check-up and overall educated me more on the care of a CAG. The fun part for me is going to get him to take his medicine and to get him to eat some of the supplements the vet gave me until he decides to eat some of his new food...good thing is he seems to like everything that is given to him to eat.

 

 

Trust me, he will peobably HATE the antibiotics! LOL

 

I couldn't agree more here, but I feel that if you get a rescue, the bird needs to go to the vet within the first few days. If you know you will be getting the bird, go ahead and make an appointment, and have the cash set aside. Taking in a rescue is a commitment... it is your job to save this animal in every way possible, and that includes ensuring that their health is good. Also, I have my birds in the vet every 6 months for check ups. I feel this is very important as well. Since birds hide their illness it is not easy to tell when they are sick like a cat or dog. They need to be examined often so that we can catch these things in time.

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It's important to get any new fid checked out, just as a precaution. Really glad to hear you got the jump on things here.

 

My vet, at least has no objection to putting things like Baytril into the fid's food. You just need to be sure none of it's wasted so they're getting fully dosed. This might be easier on you both if you mixed the meds into a tiny amount of oatmeal. I like to feed it off the spoon so I can be sure none of it gets spilled or thrown. Just a suggestion, if you want to try it & your vet doesn't objection.

 

Oatmeal seems to be very good for crop digestion & particularly good for crop issues. Lots of fids really like it. So it's not a bad food to include in his diet while he recovers, whether or not you use it to deliver the meds.

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I always get my fids checked out and in the past I was very lucky with my other two they didn't have any health issues. I will say in the short time I've had Andy, he's gotten friendly with me and allows his head to be petted. It's my boyfriend who's going to be giving him his syringe, for some reason Andy bonded with him the first time he met him and let's him pick him up, figures I'm the one who rescues him and my guy gets all the glory:) Really I just wanted any newbies that are just getting into parrots or those that don't think vet care is needed, to put their fids first and get them checked out. DAWL you are 100% that birds hide their sickness and it can be to late at times to get them help when you do realize they need it. Birdhouse I might try the oatmeal idea, it's not as easy to give birds meds as it is the dogs or horses.

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I agree with Birdhouse about the oatmeal. Hopefully he will take it. I tried that with Barnaby, but he figured it out the FIRST time I tried to give it to him, and refused it. Unfortunately, I hae to towel him to administer his Baytril, but he forgives me quickly, and it is worth it anyhow to make sure he gets better. He does bite at the towel, so I have to be VERY careful where I place my hands... definitely don't want to get a bite from him...at least not yet, I am sure it will happen sooner or later (later if I am lucky)!

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