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DNA Sexed Male Laid an egg!


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Max is almost 11 and laid an egg today. He was DNA sexed at age 1 by blood and came back Male. Has anyone else had this issue? I thought this test was accurate. What's going on!

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Max is almost 11 and laid an egg today. He was DNA sexed at age 1 by blood and came back Male. Has anyone else had this issue? I thought this test was accurate. What's going on!

 

The test is accurate. Rarely, a male can lay an egg. Most of the time the male is a very mature adult bird. The male usually ignores the egg and won't lay another one. Mother nature and excess hormones can cause this. It's noything to worry about and more than likely, it won't happen again. This subject has been brought up a few times before on this board because others have gone through the same experience but that was quite a while ago. Had the bird been a female, this type of thing would have happened a long time ago when the female was just starting to mature (5, 6 yrs old) Excessive hormones during breeding season can cause a hen to do that.

The bird that this type of thing happens to very often are cockatiels (males and females)

 

PS--also, usually the male that it happens to was never a breeder but it can happen to breeding males once in a great while.

Edited by Dave007
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So there is a rudimentary ovary inside these males?

 

Well, if that's the name you wanna give it, that's fine. Personally, I've never bothered to find out what the scientific name is. It doesn't matter what it's called. I just know that it happens with different birds and there's nothing to worry about. I've seen it happen countless times. A vet also told me that it periodically happens to males. One of my friend's TAG has done this in the past and the bird is a successful breeder. He was 15 when this happened.

Edited by Dave007
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I never knew it was possible for a male bird to lay an egg, very interesting and you are right Ray, we learn something new every day.

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Interesting indeed! That means that if Timber ever laid an egg it wouldn't mean positively that he/she was female. Sounds like the frequency and his reaction to it would though. Thanks for the info!

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Reproductive Tract

Female

In female psittacines only the left ovary is functional. Birds of prey and the kiwi have a right ovary. An inactive ovary is miniature, somewhat triangular shaped with white follicular material present. An immature ovary could be mistaken for the adrenal gland or vice versa. An active ovary can be quite large, containing numerous follicles. In cockatoos, some macaws and some conures, the ovary will be black (melanistic). The oviduct is a single tubular structure divided into 5 parts. The proximal portion is the infundibulum, which receives the ovum and where fertilization occurs. The magnum is the largest part and secretes mucin/albumin to cover the ovum. The third portion is the isthmus, which is a non-glandular connection. The uterus, or shell gland is the fourth region and covers the egg with shell and pigment if present. The final portion is the vagina which connects to cloaca, receives and may store the semen.

Male

Male birds possess internal paired testes, epididymis, ductus deferens, and in some species, a phallus. The testes vary in color from white, yellow to brown or black in cockatoos. The testes vary in size according to breeding state; immature testes are extremely small, while a bird in breeding condition will have immense testes. When out of season, they will reduce to a smaller size, but never as small as immature testes.

http://www.4parrots.com/Basic_Avian_Anatomy.htm

 

 

http://www.birdsnways.com/wisdom/ww33eiv.htm

 

MALE:

reprom.gif

 

Although most male birds have no external sex organs, the male does have two testes which become hundreds of times larger during the breeding season to produce sperm.[16] The testes in male birds are generally asymmetric with most birds having a larger left testis.[17] Female birds in most families have only one functional ovary (the left one), connected to an oviduct — although two ovaries are present in the embryonic stage of each female bird. Some species of birds have two functional ovaries, and the order Apterygiformes always retain both ovaries.[18][19]

In the males of species without a phallus (see below), sperm is stored in the semenal glomera within the cloacal protuberance prior to copulation. During copulation, the female moves her tail to the side and the male either mounts the female from behind or in front (as in the stitchbird), or moves very close to her. The cloacae then touch, so that the sperm can enter the female's reproductive tract. This can happen very fast, sometimes in less than half a second.[20]

The sperm is stored in the female's sperm storage tubules for a week to more than a 100 days,[21] depending on the species. Then, eggs will be fertilized individually as they leave the ovaries, before the shell is calcified (for species that produce hard shells) in the oviduct. After the egg is laid by the female, the embryo continues to develop in the egg outside the female body.

 

FEMALE:

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Edited by Jayd
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I did that same research and still am wondering how the formation of an egg is possible in a male. Not arguing Dave just bewildered.

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im sorry but a male can not lay an egg. im going to research this a bit more. so far every google link i have found says no.

Edited by carlsjr
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:) Good opinions and responses from both personal experiences and research have been presented. :) Maybe we should move on to other subjects and threads.:):):):):):)
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Thanks for the copy/paste of the male birds anatomy Jay.

 

I would get another dna test. The first test was obviously wrong, which does happen. Wait a minute..... why is my tummy getting larger and I want some pickles and ice cream.... hmmm. :P

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Lets discuss egg laying.Sophie is DNA sexed female. Never an egg, never a molt ( that I have noticed). No sexual aggression. Nothing! Kiki our other female, is a nightmare with mood swings. No eggs, but we all step on tiptoes( dogs, birds and family), when she is molting. Whats others experience? Nancy

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