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Ray P

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Did you know that escaped pet parrots have established breeding populations in nearly half of U.S. states ???

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No I didn't know that! What an interesting topic. Is Illinois on the list?

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Yes with Chicago having a large pop. of Monk a.k.a. Quaker parakeet parrots.

The Quaker is outlawed in a number of  states because of damage they do.

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I had no idea! 

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Always fascinating how life will find a way.  Sometimes cool, sometimes just dangerous for the parrots living in the wrong habitat. I always worry such parrots will become invasive and then killed by local gov't regulations. 

I remember watching a documentary years ago The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill.  Not sure what kind of parrots -- green but not Amazons, I think. 

I have no idea if they still have a wild colony somewhere today.

Anyway, a google search would tell more than I remember (okay, I googled -- apparently these were conures). 

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It`s amazing how well some of these parrots adapted to the colder climate and are doing very well in their new environment.

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A new study has found that 56 parrot species can be found across the country-the result of pet birds escaping or being released into the wild.

Pet parrots are found in the wild in 23 states that are doing well.

A study said it is possible to see a wild parrot in nearly every state. But large breeding populations are in 23 states.

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We have many flocks of parrots throughout San Diego county. It's such a joy to watch them fly, interact with each other and chatter away. I've often wondered how many of them used to be people's pets and  are now a part of these amazing flocks.

The weather here is kind to them, too, which is likely why we have so many flocks.

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Escaped parrots have to find a way to deal with their unfortunate new found freedom and many have adapted to the environment so it doesn't  surprise me in the least.

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London, UK has a very large number of wild ring neck parakeets. See here for more info: https://londonist.com/london/great-outdoors/london-s-parakeets-everything-you-need-to-know

One of my friends was visitng someone in London and sitting in their back garden- the ringnecks were flying overhead and he asked me if I knew anything about it. I had heard about them before but then read that article about it for some more information. Nobody quite knows how they got there. There are lots of theories. Either way, they seem to have adapted and florished ever since.

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Here in Texas we have populations of Quakers, Cherry Head Conures and in South Texas we have nesting groups of Red Crowned Amazons, Canary Wing Conures and a few other species. 

New study explains why parrots ended up flocking to Texas ...

 

 
May 29, 2019 - From 2002 to 2016, bird watchers recorded 23,992 sightings of parrots in the outdoors in Texas, according to the study, recently published in ...
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